Saturday, 30 November 2013

The Aesthetic of the Crosby Garrett Helmet

I was lecturing at the Institute of Philosophy yesterday on "The Intention of the Artist". One of my examples---and we noticed that the archaeologists speaking at the conference tended to use examples---was the helmet allegedly found at Crosby Garrett. I was suggesting that the aesthetic for what would have been a commonplace parade helmet in the Roman world had changed when it was presented at auction in London or placed in an exhibition at the Royal Academy. We had a useful debate about the "showiness" of such helmets and the parallel with its presentation as a "masterpiece".

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1 comment:

kyri said...

a chair by chippendale was just another chair 300 years ago,i have seen "experts" wax lyrical over a louis XIV clock and saying that it is "a work of art" a "masterpiece"our museums are filled with vases,furniture,carpets,even chamber pots all of which were made for everyday use but are now considered works of art in their own right.a greek vase made by a greek potter 2000 years ago to be buried in a tomb was just another pot but when we scratch beneath the surface and take a good look at the workmanship,the skill involved the craftmanship needed to put a brushstroke hear or chisel a piece of wood there than we start to understand that yes,this chair,this vase this helmet is indeed a masterpiece and a great work of art.
whats wrong with that.
kyri.

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