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Objects identified from the Medici Dossier

Christos Tsirogiannis and I have reviewed the way that objects surfacing on the antiquities market can be identified through the Medici Dossier. It notes that some of the databases have been using information from the dossier, and that information has in some cases been passed to auction houses. This suggests that there needs to be an improved due diligence process for those involved with the market.

Gill, D. W. J., and C. Tsirogiannis. 2016. "Polaroids from the Medici dossier: continued sightings on the market." In Art crime: terrorists, tomb raiders, forgers and thieves, edited by N. Charney: 229-39. New York: Palgrave Macmillan.

The paper is a revision of:
Gill, D. W. J., and C. Tsirogiannis. 2011. "Polaroids from the Medici Dossier: continued sightings on the market." Journal of Art Crime 5: 27-33.

Full details of the book can be found here.

Other contributors:

  • George H.O. Abungu, Okello Abungu Heritage Consultants, Kenya 
  • Stefano Alessandrini, Specialist Consultant to the Ministero per i Beni Culturali and the Advocate General 
  • Maurizio Fiorilli, Italy 
  • Colonel Matthew Bogdanos, New York County District Attorney's Office, USA 
  • Toby J.A. Bull, Hong Kong Police Force, Hong Kong SAR 
  • Neil Brodie, University of Glasgow, UK 
  • Duncan Chappell, Australian Institute of Criminology 
  • Noah Charney, Association for Research into Crimes against Art 
  • Simon A. Cole, Newkirk Center for Science and Society, USA 
  • Tess Davis, University of Glasgow, UK 
  • Asif Efrat, Interdisciplinary Center Herzliya, Israel 
  • Paolo Girogio Ferri, Former Italian State Prosecutor 
  • David Gill, University Campus Suffolk, UK 
  • Blake Gopnik, Art Critic 
  • Patricia Kennedy Grimsted, Harvard University, USA 
  • Karl von Habsburg-Lothringen, Association of National Committees of the Blue Shield 
  • Jerome Hasler, Art Recovery Group International 
  • Charles Hill, Formerly London Metropolitan Police, UK 
  • Saskia Hufnagel, Queen Mary University London, UK 
  • Martin Kemp, University of Oxford, UK 
  • John Kerr, University of Roehampton, UK 
  • Thierry Lenain, Université Libre de Bruxelles, Belgium 
  • Simon Mackenzie, University of Glasgow, UK 
  • Christopher A. Marinello, Art Recovery Group International 
  • Erik Nemth, Independent Scholar 
  • Vernon Rapley, Victoria and Albert Museum, UK 
  • Lawrence Rothfield, University of Chicago, USA 
  • Laurie W. Rush, US Army 
  • Francesco Rutelli, Associazione Priorita' Cultura, Italy 
  • Howard Spiegler, Herrick, Feinstein's International Art Law Group 
  • Arthur Tompkins, District Court Judge, New Zealand 
  • Christos Tsirogiannis, University of Glasgow, UK 
  • Bill Wei, Cultural Heritage Agency of the Netherlands



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