Thursday, 25 September 2008

"Homecoming" for Part of the Parthenon Frieze

A fragment of the Parthenon frieze has been returned to Greece (Επιστρέφει στην Ελλάδα θραύσμα του γλυπτού διάκοσμου του Παρθενώνα από το Παλέρμο, in.gr September 23, 2008). The sculpture forms part of the foot of Artemis from the East Frieze (Slab VI). The piece has been on display in the Museo Archeologico Regionale "Antonino Salinas". Its return reflects the growing cultural links between Italy and Greece.

The Parthenon fragment forms part of the exhibition, "Nostoi", in the New Acropolis Museum which opened yesterday (September 24, 2008). Mihalis Liapis, the Hellenic Minister of Culture spoke at the press launch. Unlike many of the other returned antiquities that have been acquired by museums and private collectors since 1970, the Parthenon fragment is a reminder that Greece considers it has a strong moral claim to cultural property removed from its soil even prior to the formation of the modern Greek state. Liapis considered the New Acropolis Museum to be one large "nostos" (το Νέο Μουσείο της Ακρόπολης είναι το μουσείο ενός μεγάλου νόστου).

Image
From in.gr.

3 comments:

Γρηγορης Αντωνοπουλος said...

[...] "that Greece considers it has a strong moral claim to cultural property removed from its soil even prior to the formation of the modern Greek state"

I think that the argument for the return of the Parthenon Marbles to Greece is not a "moral" but a scientific/archaeological one... Unless you're talking about scientific morality/integrity.

David Gill said...

The scientific / archaeological claim is that the architectural sculptures will be united in a building that overlooks the Parthenon. The New Acropolis Museum is a stunning structure that will enhance the display of these sculptures.

And then there is the issue of the integrity of these 5th century monuments.

Γρηγορης Αντωνοπουλος said...

Thank you, I completely agree with these arguments

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