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Reviews of Who Owns Antiquity?

Reviews of James Cuno's controversial Who Owns Antiquity? (Princeton University Press, 2008) are now beginning to appear. As I have nearly finished writing my own response for an academic journal, I have gathered these views for convenience. They include:
  • Roger Atwood, "Insider: Guardians of Antiquity?", Archaeology 61, 4 (Jul / August 20080 [link]
  • Christopher Chippindale, The Art Newspaper [link]
  • Andrew Herrmann, "You Can't Have Your Stuff Back", Chicago Sun Times May 4, 2008 [Lootingmatters response]
  • Deanna Isaacs, "Who Owns antiquity?", Chicagoreader.com June 5, 2008 [link]
  • Madeline Nusser, "War of the World", Time Out Chicago 169, May 22-28, 2008 [link]
  • Kwame Opoku, Afrikanet.info June 9, 2008 [link]
  • Eric Ormsby, "Treasures on Trial", Wall Street Journal April 26, 2008 [link]
  • Lee Rosenbaum, "Cuno Conundrum: Whose Law Is It, Anyway?", Culturegrrl, May 21, 2008 [link]
  • Edward Rothstein, "Antiquities, the World is your Homeland", New York Times May 27, 2008 [link]
  • Robin Simon, "Losing our Marbles?", New Statesman June 5, 2008 [link]
  • "The Great Heritage War", The Economist June 12, 2008 [link]
  • "Who owns antiquity? Local museums or experts' countries", IHT May 22, 2008 [link]
  • Peter Stone, "Clinging on to their marbles", THE July 3, 2008 [link]
  • Jonathan Keates, "Why the Elgin Marbles Should Stay", The Sunday Telegraph, July 6, 2008 [link]
  • Ben Macintyre, "Let's all have tickets to the universal museum", Times online, July 10, 2008.
  • Tiffany Jenkins, "Culture Knows No Political Borders", The Spectator, July 16, 2008. [link]
  • Christian Tyler, "Who Owns Antiquity?", Financial Times, August 4, 2008 [link]
  • Alan Behr, "A Humanist Plea for Free-ranging Antiquities", Culturekiosque, August 14, 2008 [link]
  • Jerome M. Eisenberg, Minerva 19.4 (July / August 2008) [link]
  • Mary Katherine Ascik, "National Treasures. Must the artifacts of culture be the property of states?", The Weekly Standard 13 / issue 46 (16 August 2008) [link]
  • Charles Saumarez Smith, "National Trust", Literary Review (August 2008).
  • Ingrid D. Rowland, "Found and Lost", The New Republic (September 24, 2008) [link]
  • Roger Bland, "What's yours in mine", London Review of Books (November 6, 2008) [link]
  • Colin Renfrew, Burlington Magazine 150 (November 2008) 768. [review]
  • David W.J. Gill, American Journal of Archaeology 113.1 (2009). [review]
  • Britt Peterson, "Tales from the Vitrine: Battles Over Stolen Antiquities", The Nation January 7, 2009 [= January 29, 2009 edition]. [review]
  • Jenifer Neils, American Scientist April 26, 2009 [review]
  • Irene Winter, The Art Bulletin  91, 4 (December 2009), 522-26 [link]
  • Princeton University Press website with other reviews
Please let me know of other reviews so that they can be added here (leave a comment below).
  • For my earlier comments on James Cuno's views on antiquities

Comments

DR.KWAME OPOKU said…
THOUGH NOT A REVIEW, THE RADIO DISCUSSION BETWEEN CUNO AND CONFORTI MAY BE INTERESTING. KWAME OPOKU

Cuno and AAMD President Michael Conforti join KCRW general manager Ruth Seymour and art critic Edward Goldman in discussion.

http://www.kcrw.com/etc/programs/pc/pc080610who_owns_antiquitieskwame
DR.KWAME OPOKU said…
WHAT ABOUT TOM FLYNN,FIAT CUNO?




http://tom-flynn.blogspot.com/2008/06/fiat-cuno.html
DR.KWAME OPOKU said…
Please note
James Cuno: Apologist for Hypocrisy
By S. Okwunodu Ogbechie

http://aachronym.blogspot.com/2008/07/james-cuno-apologist-for-hypocrisy.html
DR.KWAME OPOKU said…
PLEASE NOTE THE EXCELLENT REVIEW BY INGRID ROWLAND IN THE NEW REPUBLIC. http://www.powells.com/review/2008_09_18.html

KWAME OPOKU
Walser & Co. said…
Charles Saumarez Smith, "National Trust" LITERARY REVIEW (August 2008)

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