Skip to main content

Italy: Swell of opinion against change in legislation

It looks as if there is a growing swell of public opinion against the changes to Italian legisation relating to antiquities ("Fermato l'archeocondono. Una vittoira della società' civile", ANA July 12, 2010). The proposed change will probably not form part of the budget (see earlier comments).

Tsao Cevoli, the president of the Associazione Nazionale Archeologi (ANA), has spoken about the widespread public support that could not be ignored by politicians:
Il mondo politico non ha potuto, infatti, ignorare un appello nato dal basso e che in pochi giorni ha dilagato in internet, raccogliendo migliaia di adesioni da parte di esponenti del mondo accademico e istituzionali, degli enti locali e delle associazioni, ma anche di tantissimi cittadini italiani e stranieri, che si sono sentiti subito mobilitati. E' una vittoria di tutti noi
However the new legislation remains due for submission.
Il pericolo non è tuttavia del tutto cessato. L'archeocondono, infatti, resta ancora depositato in Parlamento sotto forma di proposta di legge. Insieme a tutti coloro i quali in questi giorni ci hanno sostenuto continueremo a vigilare affinchè questo provvedimento non passi e a batterci per una corretta gestione dei beni culturali nel nostro Paese.
The support is amazing. Well over 5000 members of the Facebook site (AIA is a mere 1343!), and over 3300 signatures for the online petition.

Bookmark and Share so Your Real Friends Know that You Know

Comments

Popular posts from this blog

The Getty Kouros: "The moral is, never ever buy a piece without a provenance"

In the wake of the 1992 Athens conference to discuss the Getty kouros (85.AA.40), one of the delegates, a "distinguished" American museum curator, was quoted ("Greek sculpture; the age-old question", The Economist June 20, 1992):
The moral is, never ever buy a piece without a provenance.
The recent discussions about the return of antiquities from North American museums to Italy and Greece may seem far removed from the acquisition of what appears to be a forged archaic Greek sculpture in the 1980s. However, there are some surprising overlaps.

The statue arrived at the Getty on September 18, 1983 in seven pieces. True (1993: 11) subsequently asked two questions:
Where was it found? As it was said to have been in a Swiss private collection for fifty years, why had it never been reassembled, though it was virtually complete?
A similar statue surfacing in the 1930s
A decision was taken to acquire the kouros in 1985. The official Getty line at the time (and reported in Russell…

Symes and a Roman medical set

Pierre Bergé & Associés of Paris are offering a rare Roman bronze medical set (16 May 2018, lot 236). Its recorded history is: "Ancienne collection Hishiguro, Tokyo, 1992". The catalogue entry helpfully informs us that the set probably came from a burial ("Cette trousse de chirurgien a probablement été découverte dans une sépulture ...").

The set appears to be the one that has been identified by Dr Christos Tsirogannis from an image in the Schinousa archive thus linking it to Robin Symes.

Given that the catalogue entry suggests that this piece came from a funerary context and that the history of the piece can only be traced back to 1992 (and not to 1970), questions are being raised about the set's origins.

What due diligence was conducted on the medical set prior to offering it for sale? Did Symes sell the set to Hishiguro? How did Symes obtain the set? Who sold it to him?

I understand that the appropriate authorities in France are being informed about the …

The Minoan Larnax and the Michael C. Carlos Museum

I was recently asked to comment on the acquisition of recently surfaced antiquities in Greece as part of an interview. One of the examples I gave was the Minoan larnax that was acquired by the Michael C. Carlos Museum. Although this piece has been discussed in the Greek press, the museum has not yet responded to the apparent identification in the Becchina archive.

Is the time now right for the Michael C. Carlos Museum or the wider authorities at Emory University to negotiate the return of this impressive piece so that it can be placed on display in a museum in Greece?