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Bonhams: Italian Press Release

A short press statement has appeared ("Bonham's ritira sculture Romane, forse origine illegale", ANSA April 28, 2010) following up the article in The Guardian:

(ANSA) - 28 APR - Quattro sculture romane che avrebbero dovuto essere messe all'asta in Gran Bretagna, sono state ritirate dalla vendita poiché potrebbero essere il frutto di scavi illegali. Il Guardian riferisce che tre busti funerari e una statua di marmo risalenti a circa il II secolo d.C. potrebbero essere stati rinvenuti in scavi non autorizzati in Siria o nel nord della Grecia, e in Italia. A batterli sarebbe stata la casa d'aste di Londra Bonham's, che aveva stimato il loro valore attorno alle 40.000 sterline e che ora ha avviato un'indagine interna, parallela a quella della polizia, per scoprire la reale provenienza delle opere. Secondo l'archeologo David Gill, dell'Università di Swansea in Gran Bretagna, non ci sarebbero dubbi: le opere presentavano tracce di terreno che fanno pensare alla provenienza illecita. Gli scavi illegali, in forte aumento, rischiano di distruggere i contesti in cui le opere vengono ritrovate e danneggiare il lavoro degli archeologi. Secondo il noto archeologo di Cambridge Lord Renfrew, Londra - già nota per essere un'ottima piazza per la ricettazione dell'antiquariato - riconfermerebbe così la sua reputazione.

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